Press Release

Posted by Jay Jay Nesheim on March 1, 2012

President Barack Obama Talks Sports with Grantland.com’s Bill Simmons for his Podcast “The B.S. Report”

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President Obama sat down yesterday to discuss sports and pop culture with Grantland.com’s Editor in Chief Bill Simmons for his popular podcast “The B.S. Report.”  Simmons spoke with the President at the White House for approximately 25 minutes for a podcast that is now available on Grantland.com, at ESPN.com’s Podcenter and on iTunes.  Click here to download the full podcast: “The B.S. Report: Barack Obama.” 

 The interview covered a wide range of topics including: Jeremy Lin, the Chicago Bulls, throwing out first pitches at baseball games and the President’s favorite character from The Wire. Portions of the podcast will also be featured on ESPN’s SportsCenter and on ESPN.com.

“The B.S. Report” is consistently among the most downloaded podcasts with more than 700,000 downloads per episode. In 2011, the podcast’s download total was over 92 million.  Recent guests have included comedian Louis CK, NBA legend Larry Bird, Sugar Ray Leonard, Jimmy Kimmel, Seth Myers, amongst others.

“The B.S. Report” with President Obama included the following highlights:

On possibly losing his post as the most famous Harvard grad:

President: “…I knew about Jeremy before you did, or everybody else did, because Arne Duncan, my Secretary of Education, was captain of the Harvard team.  And so way back when, Arne and I were playing and he said, I’m telling you, we’ve got this terrific guard named Jeremy Lin at Harvard.  And then one of my best friends, his son is a freshman at Harvard, and so when he went for a recruiting trip he saw Lin in action.  So I’ve been on the Jeremy Lin bandwagon for a while.”

On his beloved Chicago Bulls:

Q:    Over the last five years, how many times have you envisioned welcoming the world champion Chicago Bulls to the White House?

THE PRESIDENT:  Every year.  And it hasn’t happened yet, but it will happen.

Q:    It will happen?  You’re like Joe Namath — you’re guaranteeing it.

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I’ve got another five years here and — (laughter)

Q:    You’re guaranteeing that, too.  (Laughter)

THE PRESIDENT:  — somewhere along the line my Bulls are going to come through here. Absolutely.

On the possibility of a college football playoff:

THE PRESIDENT: Looks like — I hear there’s talk that they’re going to at least start maybe with a four-team playoff…

Q:    So you’re happy about this?

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I’d rather see it eight teams, but four is a good place to start.  I think that gets us on the right trend.  Nothing is more frustrating than at the end of the season, nobody knows who won.  And what, there is some poll? Coaches make a decision?  Nobody knows what that means.  Because part of what makes sports great, part of what makes March Madness great, the NFL playoffs great, is every once in a while something happens during the playoffs that shows the character of a team. Look at the Giants this year.  Nobody would have picked them.  They wouldn’t have been crowned as champions if you had a coaches’ poll at the end of the year.  But they made the plays when it counted.

Media contacts:

Jay Jay Nesheim, jayjay.nesheim@espn.com, 646-547-5839

Kevin Ota, kevin.r.ota@espn.com, 860-766-9581